Spotlight on Elissa Polley, 2L

Elissa Polley, 2L
Undergrad: University of Minnesota-Duluth
Major: Environmental Studies
Q. Where are you from? 
A.
A tiny town in northern Minnesota called Tamarack!

Q. How did you spend your summer? 
A. I spent my 1L summer with Shared Hope International and National District Attorneys Association in the D.C. area. I assisted them with anti-trafficking projects including legislative research and recommendations for The Protected Innocence Project, as well as case law research on labor and sex trafficking convictions involving force, fraud, and coercion. This summer I will spend the first half with Traffick 911 in Dallas, Texas working with minor victims of trafficking and creating a legislative advocacy program, and the second half with Norfolk Commonwealth Attorneys Office to gain prosecution experience.

Q. What does becoming a lawyer mean to you? 
A. Becoming a lawyer means that I have a platform and a responsibility to be a voice for the voiceless. It means using the God given skills I have to seek justice for those who do not have access to, or an understanding of, the justice system. It means protecting life through justice from the womb to the grave.

Q. What do you wish you knew before you started law school? 
A. Nothing, I would have done it the same way! Law school has been obeying the call of God for my life and trusting Him for the outcome. If I had known before I went how life altering it would be, I may not have obeyed as quickly. (This ride is not for the faint of heart, but with God ALL things are possible!)

Q. What surprised you most about Regent? 
A. The kindness of the faculty and staff! From Dean Brauch, to the professors, to the staff, I have been blessed. From my admissions process with Bonnie Creef, to the daily devotions by my professors, to donut day with the dean, this experience has been a great representation of the love of Christ being reflected in the actions of the faculty and staff.

Q. How is law school different from your college experience? 
A. The amount of time I spend studying is the major difference. I focused more on friends and sports in undergrad and much more on writing in my master’s program. Also, a positive difference in law school is that I enjoy the in-depth discussions, and the heightened level of intellect of these discussions.

Q. What is your favorite class so far and why? 
A. I would have to say Immigration Law and Evidence top the list because Professor Valverde and Professor Duane are passionate about these subjects and passed that along to me! I also must add that before law school I would have never imagined being interested or even excited about Civil Procedure, but now it makes me want to jump up on tables thanks to Professor Madison!

Q. What kind of law do you hope to practice after graduation? 
A. I am open to being stateside or international, and can see public interest/human rights law in my future, with an emphasis on anti-trafficking and protection of children.

Q. How would you describe the group of your closest friends found here at Regent? 
A. I like to think of my friends at Regent as a beautiful mosaic. Each come from differing backgrounds, varying interests, unique talents, but we care deeply for one another. We encourage, support, and pray for one another regularly. On the days when law school is overwhelming, these friends have been there to offer a kind word or a reminder that we are going to make it!

Q. How do you prefer to study? 
A. My favorite place is in my backyard (weather permitting!) with a glass of sweet tea within reach. Because I am a mom, my “when” and “where” vary depending on my family, but early in the morning and late at night seem to be my best times. I have a great study area in my home with plenty of snacks and chocolate to get me through. I also have an amazing husband who cooks, and kids who love to serve me coffee or tea, so I am well cared for during my study times!

Q. What is your favorite book of all time and why? 
A. I am a huge fan of books of all kinds, yet I adore classic children’s books most of all. I would have to say Boxcar Children is my favorite, but Jenny Goes to Sea comes in at a close second! The theme of both of these books has to do with the characters finding adventure in unusual places. While facing different kinds of difficulty, they make the most of where they are and use what tools are available to them for success. (Sounds similar to law school?)

Q. What is your favorite Bible verse? 
A. “But be sure to fear the LORD and serve him faithfully with all your heart; consider what great things he has done for you.” 1 Samuel 12: 24. This verse encourages me to live out my faith and love for God on a daily basis. I am grateful that even though I am still “a work in progress,” he strengthens me and blesses my life in infinite ways!

Q. If you could meet with anyone alive or dead, who would it be and why? 
A. I would meet Christine Caine, the founder of The A-21 Campaign. She is a wife, mother, and world changer. She had a choice early in her life to be a victim, or a victor. As she allowed God to bring her through the darkness, she began to realize the greatness He had planted in her. She now uses that greatness to rescue and restore victims of human trafficking. I admire her greatly, and hope to meet her someday either at a conference, or because I work for her!

Q. If you could have lunch with any faculty member or administrator at Regent who would it be and why? 
A. Professor Van Essendelft! She is an amazing woman of God, not to mention a marvelous instructor! She encouraged me a lot during 1L year and I would love to chat with her more outside of looming LARW brief deadlines!

Q. What kinds of extra-curricular activities are you involved with? 
A. Track, Baseball, and Soccer mom, Women’s Leadership Council at my church, The Center for Global Justice Student Staff, International Law Society Board, Law Chapel Media Representative for COGS, and Kaplan Representative.

Q. If you had an entire weekend available, what would you do in the Hampton Roads area? 
A. First, I would pack up the car with a picnic and beach gear. I would bring along my “liquid sunshine.” (i.e. my husband and kids!) We would explore a beach we have not been to and swim, boogie board, build sandcastles, and find hidden treasures (which often amount to a pile of shells!). When we are completely worn out from the beach we would head to Captain George’s and indulge on the finest seafood buffet around!

Q. Is there anything else you would like your peers or future law students to learn about you? 
A. I have learned that the following sermon quote fits well with my law school experience and the perspective I have gained through the challenges and joys of it all: “God does not call the equipped, He equips the called!”

Spotlight on Susan Niccolls, 3L

Susan Niccolls, 3L
Undergrad: California State University, Chico
Major: International Relations and Religious Studies
Q. Where are you from? 
A. El Sobrante, California, a small town in the San Fransisco Bay Area

Q. How did you spend your summer? 
A. I worked with a family law attorney back in California, took the non-profit tax exempt organizations and started working on planning chapel for the fall. My 1L summer I went to Strasbourg.

Q. What does becoming a lawyer mean to you?
A. Well, first I've wanted to be a lawyer for as long as I can remember so it means fulfilling a childhood dream. It also means gaining the tools and skills to work towards justice when I return to California.

Q. What do you wish you knew before you started law school?
A. That there was going to be a fire, a hurricane and an earthquake all in the first month, and the proper use of the comma. (I have always had issues with commas.)

Q. What surprised you most about Regent?
A. How cooperative everyone was. Before going to law school, I'd heard horror stories about how awful law school was and how cut throat ever one was, but people were nice, and really helpful.

Q. How is law school different from your college experience?
A. I think the biggest difference is that all the reading is necessary. In undergrad I could get away without even buying the books for some classes, and that is definitely not true for law school.

Q. What is your favorite class so far and why?
A. Favorite class is hard to pick, but I think I would say Evidence, partially because Professor Duane made it fun, and partially because I love classes where you have easy to learn rules, which is why one of my other favorites was Civil Procedure.

Q. What kind of law do you hope to practice after graduation?
A. I want to do some type of litigation, preferably criminal law, but I'd be open to anything but the transactional and corporate stuff.

Q. How would you describe the group of your closest friends found here at Regent?
A. Cool and nerdy.

Q. How do you prefer to study?
A. I review things before reading period but most of the time my major studying is done starting the week before finals and then during finals weeks until I have taken all my finals. When studying I like to either stay home or go to a friend’s place and study until I feel prepared for the test. When I study more than that I tend to stress out and start second guessing myself.

Q. What is your favorite book of all time and why?
A. It is almost impossible to pick one but I guess if I had to I'd pick CS Lewis's Narnia books. (Yes, I know it's technically seven books, but they are all really short.). I've always loved reading and books in general and I remember my mom reading five of them to me when I was a very little girl (she skipped 6 Magicians Nephew because of hard to pronounce names and 7 Last Battle because she said I was too young) so I guess I've been conditioned to love those books.

Q. What is your favorite Bible verse? 
A. Habakkuk 3: 17 and 18, “Though the fig tree does not bud and there are no grapes on the vines, though the olive crop fails and the fields produce no food, though there are no sheep in the pen and no cattle in the stalls, yet I will rejoice in the Lord, I will be joyful in God my Savior.” This verse inspires me to be joyful at all occasions, something that isn't always easy to do.

Q. If you could have lunch with any faculty member or administrator at Regent who would it be and why?
A. I'm not sure when I was in Professor Ching's Contracts class he had people have lunch with him and that was fun and provided some really good advice. I'd probably say Professor Duane, he is a great professor and he teaches my favorite subjects. Although maybe I should say Ching or Pryor since I still don't understand parts of Contracts.

Q. What kinds of extra-curricular activities are you involved with?
A. I am currently one of the Law School Chaplains, I'm involved in Phi Alpha Delta and ADR, off campus I'm a member of my church's choir.

Q. If you had an entire weekend available, what would you do in the Hampton Roads area?
A. I don't know, I never know what I'm going to do with free time. I might go to the Botanical Gardens in Norfolk or I might just do nothing. I sometimes miss being able to sit and do nothing.

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Spotlight on Amanda "Shelby" Wallace, 3L

Amanda "Shelby" Wallace, 3L
Undergrad: Towson University
Major: International Studies and Mandarin Chinese


Q. Where are you from? A. Baltimore, Maryland.

Q. How did you spend your summer? 
A. 1L summer I worked for Congressman Forbes in the Chesapeake office. Last summer I interned at the ACLJ.

Q. What does becoming a lawyer mean to you? 
A. It means having the knowledge and tenacity to help people and the causes I care about.

Q. What do you wish you knew before you started law school? 
A. I wish I knew I was going to be so stressed. I think I would have taken a cruise beforehand. But it's all good, because I'm going to Disney World as soon as I graduate! Seriously though, it's a marathon, not a sprint.

Q. What surprised you most about Regent?
A. Law school is competitive. But Regent is a very kind and encouraging environment. Not to mention the faculty really care about individual students—and like them!

Q. How is law school different from your college experience?
A. Undergrad is a mix of students, some of whom are not academically focused. Not only are the people in law school the academic type, school itself is much more demanding. Law school doesn't just teach you a new subject matter, it forces you to learn it in a new language as well.

Q. What is your favorite class so far and why?
A. Biblical law—because I like history. International law—because I am fascinated by politics and foreign affairs.

Q. What kind of law do you hope to practice after graduation?
A. I would love to work in international law. But after taking trial practice I discovered I have a passion for criminal defense as well. We shall see!

Q. How would you describe the group of your closest friends found here at Regent?
A. Most of my friends here have very unique personalities and they keep me laughing.

Q. How do you prefer to study?
A. I prefer to study during the day, on my couch, with my two dogs lounging by my side. Usually with a fresh pot of coffee, too. I can only study for about 30 minutes at a time. Then I take a 5 minute break and then get back into it. Although 1L year I used to have to wake up at 5 in the morning to study because I had a 3 year old at home—it was the only time the house was quiet.

Q. What is your favorite book of all time and why?
A. Till We Have Faces by C.S. Lewis. I like mythology and anything by C.S. Lewis.

Q. What is your favorite Bible verse?
A. Micah 6:8 "He has shown you, O mortal, what is good. And what does the Lord require of you? To act justly and to love mercy and to walk humbly with your God." This verse is kind of a mantra to me. I want to make a difference in the world by pursing what is just, but also remembering to be merciful. On top of that humility is the key to everything worthwhile.

Q. If you could meet with anyone alive or dead, who would it be and why?
A. Robert Fulton. I read a book about him when I was a kid. He had humble beginnings, but had such curiosity and drive that he became very successful in not just one, but multiple things. He taught himself French, became an excellent painter, and designed the first steam boat and submarine. His biography made me believe that I could be anything I wanted to be.

Q. If you could have lunch with any faculty member or administrator at Regent who would it be and why?
A. Professor Madison. He makes me laugh, he has a great personality, and I always enjoyed his classes. He also really cares about the spiritual growth of his students.

Q. What kinds of extra-curricular activities are you involved with?
A. I am the Chairwoman of the Republican National Lawyers Association (RNLA), a member of Phi Alpha Delta, and Secretary of the Student Animal Legal Defense Fund (SALDF). In my spare time I also paint (usually oil paintings).

Q. If you had an entire weekend available, what would you do in the Hampton Roads area?
A. Take my daughter to the beach and the zoo. It doesn't get much better than that.

Q. Is there anything else you would like your peers or future law students to learn about you?
A. I have two big dogs, Bam-Bam and Daphne. I would get a third, but the husband says no.

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Spotlight on Leslie Ann Williams, 3L


Leslie Ann Williams, 3L
Undergrad: Charleston Southern University
Major: Business Management
Q. Where are you from?
A.
I am originally from Columbus, Ohio.

Q. How did you spend your summer? 
A. In the summer after my 1L year I interned with the Honorable Calvin R. DePew, Jr., a judge at the Virginia Beach General District Court. During my 2L summer, I was a legal intern for a local firm where I primarily performed research, conducted client interviews, and drafted court documents in the domestic relations and criminal defense fields. This upcoming summer, I will be studying for the bar exam!

Q. What does becoming a lawyer mean to you? 
A. It means the fruition of a dream that I have had for many years, which provides me the opportunity to have a career I find challenging while helping people at critical moments in their lives.

Q. What do you wish you knew before you started law school? 
A. I wish I had known what an emotionally, spiritually, and mentally challenging experience law school would be.  

Q. What surprised you most about Regent? 
A. I was most surprised at how committed the faculty and staff are to the success of each student. I have formed both professional and personal relationships that will last well after law school.

Q. How is law school different from your college experience? 
A. I didn’t have the traditional college experience. I attended the University of Florida for two years after high school and then enlisted in the U.S.A.F. It wasn’t until after I got out of the military that I finished my undergraduate degree while I maintained a full-time career. All that is to say, I have had much more time to focus on law school with less distractions than I did when I was completing my undergraduate degree. However, law school is such an unknown because you don’t have a way to gauge your progress until after you have completed your first set of exams.

Q. What is your favorite class so far and why? 
A. My favorite class has been Criminal Law with Professor Craig Stern. It was Professor Stern that taught me to think beyond merely the black letter rules of law and instead to think from a more theoretical perspective in order to argue for and defend against criminal matters.

Q. What kind of law do you hope to practice after graduation? 
A. I still don’t know for certain, but I hope to be working in the family and/or criminal law arenas.

Q. How would you describe the group of your closest friends found here at Regent? 
A. My group of friends is extremely close and we endeavor to challenge, encourage, and hold each other accountable in our professional, personal, and spiritual lives. One word: eclectic.

Q. How do you prefer to study? 
A. I have to study where I feel I am the most productive. It’s all about flexibility. I have changed study locations four times in one day before to get into my optimum study groove. I never can tell where I’ll end up during a good study session. Reading energizes me and when it is purposeful to my career, it energizes me even more.

Q. What is your favorite book of all time and why? 
A. That is not a fair question because there are too many books to name, but if I had to pick one it would be To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee because it’s an example of overcoming prejudice and injustice against others while confronting the stereotypes often unacknowledged in ourselves.

Q. What is your favorite Bible verse? 
A. I don’t have a favorite verse, but a favorite chapter is 1 Corinthians 13. This chapter reminds me that the most important thing I can do is love. Not just those that are easy to love or fun to love, but those that need and deserve to be loved in spite of their sins or failings. We all have sins and failings. It’s that love which displays the heart of Jesus and what will ultimately speak more volumes than anything else I can do. It reminds me not to get caught up on approving of others sometimes when I really should be focused on accepting them.

Q. If you could meet with anyone alive or dead, who would it be and why? 
A. Again, not a fair question, but one of them would have to be Benjamin Franklin so I could ask him what the Founding Fathers really intended when they drafted the Constitution and to generally converse with such a dynamic individual.

Q. If you could have lunch with any faculty member or administrator at Regent who would it be and why? 
A. I would have lunch with Professor Eleanor Brown. She is a brilliant, Godly woman whose brain I would love to pick about various subject matters.

Q. What kinds of extra-curricular activities are you involved with? 
A. I currently serve as the Presiding Officer of the RUSL Honor Council and the Intramural Competition Coordinator for the Trial Advocacy Board.

Q. If you had an entire weekend available, what would you do in the Hampton Roads area? 
A. WHEN I have entire weekends available (yes, it is possible) I try to experience different local activities from dining at new restaurants, attending various performance arts events, touring museums, and hiking in parks.

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Spotlight on Kahryn Rombach, 3L

Kahryn Rombach, 3L
Undergrad: Hillsdale College
Major: Politics & Spanish
Q. Where are you from? 
A. I was born and raised in Midland, Michigan—the land shaped like a hand!

Q. How did you spend your summer? 
A. I spent a very invigorating summer with the Regulatory Affairs division at Consumers Energy, one of the two major electric utilities in the Lower Peninsula, and have been blessed to be able to continue working remotely for CE through my third year. My office acts as a liaison between the company and the regulator, the Michigan Public Service Commission, and the work is broad, dealing with current law, potential legislation, electric and gas tariffs, administrative rules and regulations, codes of conduct. The interplay is complex, but my team is fantastic and I love knowing that, at the end of the day, I'm serving my state by helping provide an essential commodity.

Q. What does becoming a lawyer mean to you? 
A. Going rogue! I knew I wanted to go to law school in the seventh grade, so getting my bar card means the end of a long (fulfilling, but long) road. I can quite literally do anything now, and that's exhilarating.

Q. What do you wish you knew before you started law school? 
A. I wish I'd realized that you can't be excellent at everything. I'm like most type A personalities in that I'll work really hard at everything all the time to avoid missing out on anything, but refusing to choose among options is still a choice, and, like all choices, has consequences.

Q. How is law school different from your college experience? 
A. Well, we're all studying the same thing, which is good and bad. I miss the intellectual challenge of having to keep up with art and accounting majors alike, but it's nice to be able to share an experience as a school.

Q. What is your favorite class so far and why?
A. My favorite class to this point has been Professor Hernandez's Appellate Advocacy course. It was difficult and competitive and overwhelming, but he is an incredible teacher and the work was rewarding, particularly because I could see so much improvement in my own performance from one assignment to the next. His class was also the first time I really felt like a lawyer. And that was awesome.

Q. What kind of law do you hope to practice after graduation? 
A. I had several internships in various areas of public policy and free market economics through college, so the ideal would be to get paid doing something that lets me combine both loves - policy and law. I plan to use my Spanish major to serve Michigan's Hispanic migrant worker population.

Q. How would you describe the group of your closest friends found here at Regent? 
A. The word I'd use to describe my best friends is “real.” The people who stand by me here are frank and funny and down-to-earth and confident. They don't let the lawyer thing go to their heads—they're genuine, service-oriented individuals, and interesting ones at that. They cultivate a diverse range of pursuits and interests outside law school and manage to keep this crazy season of life in perspective.

Q. How do you prefer to study? 
A. By myself. I'm too likely to inadvertently turn a study group into a party. If I lock myself in my room for long stretches, I can spread out, settle down and actually get work done.

Q. What is your favorite book of all time and why? 
A. The Great Gatsby. It's a tragedy, and I think it gets a bad rap for that reason because when we turn to American novels, we want to read good things about our people. But the story is realistic and ultimately really satisfying. It's particularly challenging for our generation, I think, because it's the ultimate YOLO story. Fitzgerald weaves something simple from a really rich, intricate pattern, and confronts the reader with this breathtaking choice between getting lost in the rush of living fast and loose and free, and breaking with the expectations of society in order to pursue true happiness. Both choices involve passion and beauty, but Fitzgerald juxtaposes their outcomes in wrenching detail and really gets it right. And his prose? Extraordinary.

Q. What is your favorite Bible verse? 
A. It changes all the time. Right now I'm into the book of Wisdom, particularly 7:15-16: “May God grant me to speak as he would wish and to conceive thoughts worthy of the gifts I have received, since he is both guide to wisdom and director of sages; for we are in his hand, yes, ourselves and our sayings, and all intellectual and all practical knowledge.” You know how some verses seem as though they were written just for you? These words are my prayer and my promise today.

Q. If you could meet with anyone alive or dead, who would it be and why? 
A. The Pope! Francis is exactly the kind of father the Church needs right now, and I'm so excited about everything he's doing. Apparently he's taken to randomly phoning the people who write him, so I'm planning to send a card off to the Vatican to see if I can get a call.

Q. What kinds of extra-curricular activities are you involved with?
A. I serve as secretary for the Moot Court Board, and I also sing with the A Capellate Advocates, the law school's own fabulous vocal ensemble.

Q. If you had an entire weekend available, what would you do in the Hampton Roads area? 
A. I'd start Saturday off with brunch at the Broken Egg Bistro with my girls, followed by a long bike ride from my house to Sandbridge and back. Saturday night, I'd grab friends and go dancing at the Granby Theatre in Norfolk. I'd have to be up early on Sunday to make it over to St. Matthew's Catholic Church for choir practice before mass—they have the best liturgy in the area. (Gregorian chant, anyone?) After that, coffee and donuts. And after that—beach!! No better way to top off a long weekend than hot pizza on the boardwalk at sunset.

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A Regent Law Wedding Story: Josh and Alexis Costello


Josh and Alexis Costello, Photo by Hampton Roads Photography

























Story by: Rachel Smith and Stephanie Hartman Rojo 

We know of several Regent Law couples who fell in love in law school and got married. We want to share Josh and Alexis Costello's story with you. 

When we asked Josh and Alexis if they thought they’d meet their spouse in law school, both emphatically said, “No!”

That changed on Tuesday, August 21, 2012.

Josh and Alexis, who answered our questions together, said they met in Dean James Murphy’s Drafting Contracts class. As stereotypical as it sounds, it was love at first sight.

Josh and Alexis Costello, Photo by Hampton Roads Photography
“Alexis walked in dressed to the nines, and Josh's jaw hit the floor,” the pair narrates. “Josh, being his bashful self, struck up a random conversation. We learned that we had not one, but three classes together.”

The next week, they went on their first date.

“It was the best decision I ever made—besides accepting Christ as my Savior,” Josh says.

It didn’t take long for Josh and Alexis to realize it was only a matter of time until they would get engaged.

On Christmas evening 2012, Josh pointed to the Christmas tree and asked Alexis to look for one last surprise.

“Maybe there’s another present,” he said.

Alexis investigated and saw a small wrapped box in a train car underneath the tree. She quickly unwrapped it. It was a ring box! Alexis opened it, but the box was empty.

“Then, Josh got on his knee, pulled a ring out of his shirt pocket, and said some sweet words that neither of us can remember,” says Alexis.

“Then I told Alexis, ‘You will make me the happiest man if you marry me,’” Josh adds. “Of course Alexis said, ‘Yes!’”

Josh and Alexis were married on Friday, September 27, 2013 at New Covenant Presbyterian Church in Virginia Beach, Virginia. In some ways, their big day was a “Regent Law Wedding.”

“Our best man, four of our bridesmaids, and one of our Scripture readers are current students or alumni. We are blessed with great friends at Regent Law. We couldn’t imagine celebrating our wedding without them.”

Costello Wedding Party, Photo by Hampton Roads Photography


Spotlight on Angela Desmond, 3L

Angela Desmond, 3L
Undergrad: Drexel University
Major: Psychology
Minor: Paralegal Studies

Q. Where are you from? A. Wallingford, Pennsylvania (Just south of Philadelphia).

Q. How did you spend your summer? 
A. The summer after my first year of law school I interned at Legal Aid in Norfolk. Last summer, I took classes and spent time traveling and visiting with family and friends.

Q. What does becoming a lawyer mean to you? 
A. Since I was very young I have always wanted to do something with my life that would allow me to help other people. The legal profession is a good way to accomplish that goal, but being a lawyer is much more than that. It can mean bringing hope into someone’s life or being the good thing among all the bad going on.

Q. What do you wish you knew before you started law school? 
A. That the Virginia Bar Application requires you to report a whole bunch of things including a great deal of places you have worked. If you know what state you would like to practice in when you graduate, make sure to look at the application and character and fitness form ahead of time so you don’t get overwhelmed by it. And remember, you can get it done. Just take it step by step.

Q. What surprised you most about Regent? 
A. The people. I knew Regent was a Christian university but the quality of the people still amazes me. Everyone is extremely friendly and always willing to help in whatever way they can.

Q. How is law school different from your college experience? 
A. At my undergraduate institution people were always focused on themselves and on what their weekends were going to entail. Law school is much more serious. Everyone is here for a reason and “has their head in the game” for the most part. Also, people are usually willing to lend a hand to help others.

Q. What is your favorite class so far and why? 
A. I took Family Law with Professor Mulford my 2L year. Family law is my favorite area of law and Professor Mulford provided a thorough look into the issues family law encompasses while being candid and realistic in providing real world examples.

Q. What kind of law do you hope to practice after graduation? 
A. Ideally, I would like to work for Legal Aid or a non-profit organization helping to provide legal services to those who are less fortunate.

Q. How would you describe the group of your closest friends found here at Regent? 
A. Well rounded. I have friends from all different backgrounds with extremely different personalities, but we get along very well.

Q. How do you prefer to study? 
A. I don’t have one set place or time for studying. It really depends on the circumstances. If I’m studying with a study group we see what is the best place and most convenient time for everyone. When I study alone it’s usually in my apartment because I feel bad leaving my dog alone for too long.

Q. What is your favorite book of all time and why?
A. Oh the Places You’ll Go! by Dr. Seuss. I gave a copy of the book to my best friend at her college graduation from the University of Pennsylvania because, although it is a children’s book, it has a very inspirational message that the world holds endless possibilities.

Q. What is your favorite Bible verse? 
A. My favorite bible verse is 1 Corinthians 13:4-7, “Love is patient, love is kind. It does not envy, it does not boast, it is not proud. It does not dishonor others, it is not self-seeking, it is not easily angered, it keeps no record of wrongs. Love does not delight in evil but rejoices with the truth. It always protects, always trusts, always hopes, always perseveres.”

Q. If you could meet with anyone alive or dead, who would it be and why? 
A. It would probably be Harriet Tubman or someone else that played a huge role in the Underground Railroad. It would be amazing to meet such a courageous person and be able to ask them questions about the experiences they had. They probably couldn’t imagine at the time that their actions would be so inspirational and have such an impact on the country.

Q. If you could have lunch with any faculty member or administrator at Regent who would it be and why? 
A. Dean Brauch. Even though the Law School has many students, Dean Brauch always says hello and asks how I am. It is obvious that he genuinely cares about each and every student in the Law School.

Q. What kinds of extra-curricular activities are you involved with? 
A. I am the Marshal and Recruitment Chair of the George Washington Chapter of the Phi Alpha Delta Fraternity (PAD), a 3L Representative of the Republican National Lawyers Association Law Student Chapter (RNLA), and an Alumni Member of Delta Zeta International Sorority.

Q. If you had an entire weekend available, what would you do in the Hampton Roads area? 
A. The beach would definitely be on the top of my list. I love going to the beach and sitting there all day when the weather permits.

Q. Is there anything else you would like your peers or future law students to learn about you? 
A. I absolutely love the Philadelphia Eagles and have an amazing little beagle named Mona who came into my life the Thanksgiving of my first year of law school.

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